AAAA Oregon Sun Stone Briolette Bracelet

AAAA Oregon Sun Stone Briolette Bracelet

These are AAAA gem quality stones. The stones were pulled from the Dust Devil Mine in Plush, Oregon USA. “Of all the stones of the earth. Absolutely stunning and one of a kind rare HUGE shining shimmering genuine Oregon Sunstone. Beautiful Champagne gold and the rose gold faceted teardrop briolette. High quality clear and natural golden dazzling light Oregon Sunstone Bracelet. Color type and color intensity is gradually changing base on angle of view.  

The Sunstones truly reflects the qualities of solar light: openness, benevolence, warmth, strength, mental clarity, and the willingness to bestow blessings on others... Sunstone is regarded as a gem of personal power, freedom, and expanded consciousness.”

A1540-BRJEU

QRC

Taiwan

(LxWxH) 170x7x6mm

16g (~1oz)

Ships within 2 Business Days

 Sun Stone  Faceted

Sun Stone

Sunstone is also called feldspar (a variety of oligoclase). This gemstone varies from golden to orange to red-brown, and can be transparent or translucent. Sunstone is metallic-looking due to sparkling red, orange or green crystalline inclusions (these are hematite or goethite).

Sunstone has a beautiful glittering sunlight effect as a result of its tiny metallic inclusions. The copper or pyrite inclusions cause sparkling flashes of light as millions of particles playfully interact with light. This feature is known as "Schiller" or “Aventurescence? Sunstones are nearly always cut as cabochons to reflect this phenomenon, but the deeper colors may also be to exhibit their superior luster.

Sunstone is formed and crystallized in lava flows. Sunstones range in color from water clear through pale yellow, soft pink, and blood red to deep blue and green. Some of the deeper colored gems have bands of varying color while others exhibit Pleochroism, showing two different colors when viewed from different directions.



Faceted

Facets are flat faces on geometric shapes. The organization of naturally occurring facets was key to early developments in crystallography, since they reflect the underlying symmetry of the crystal structure. Gemstones commonly have facets cut into them in order to improve their appearance.

Of the many hundreds of facet arrangements that have been used, the most famous is probably the round brilliant cut, used for diamond and many colored gemstones. This arrangement of 57 facets was calculated by Marcel Tolkowsky in 1919. Slight improvements have been made since then, including the addition of a 58th facet (a culet) on the bottom of the stone. Since this is calculated to show maximum brilliance, round diamonds are rarely cut in any other arrangement, although recently the Princess cut is becoming popular. Other cuts, including "rose" cuts, are most typically found in antique jewelry. See diamond cuts for an in-depth discussion and diagrams of various shapes and ways of cutting faceted stones.

The art of cutting a gem with facets is a very precise activity. The aim with a faceted cut is to produce an article that sparkles with internally reflected light, and that shows off the "fire" of the stone. Accordingly, only transparent or translucent stones are usually faceted.

The angles between each facet are precisely calculated. As the aim is to maximise the effect of the internal reflections, these angles depend on the refractive index of the material. This means that although the name and general shape of a particular cut may be the same between different materials, the actual angles will be slightly different, for the maximum effect.

Thus, although cubic zirconia and rock crystal may look similar to diamond, and all can be cut in a round brilliant cut, the angles must be different to produce the same optical effects. Additionally, as diamond has a refractive index significantly higher than the other natural transparent stones, it can have a much greater sparkle than other materials.

While some facets can be cut by cleavage, specialised machines are used for cutting arbitrary facets. These consist of two main features:

a flat abrasive, usually diamond dust of precise size bonded onto a metal disk (called 'laps') or carried by an oily fluid on a smooth metal or ceramic disk, and
a system for holding a stone onto the disk at a precise angle and position.
This usually requires the stone to be attached to a holder or dop, which is then placed in an indexed vice. This allows progressively finer abrasives to be used without disrupting the orientation of the stone. The final abrasive must be smaller than the wavelength of light, so that the scratches it creates are invisible. Modern machines tend to have indexed gears for moving the stone, so that rotating the stone to cut the next facet can be more precisely controlled.

An older machine called the jamb peg faceting machine used wooden dop sticks of precise length. By placing one end into one of many precisely located holes in the jamb peg, the other end, with the stone, could be precisely placed onto the lap. These machines took considerable skill to use effectively.

Much less commonly, faceters use cylindrical machines, which leave concave facets. This technique is most noticeably used around the gem's girdle.


  

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